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Veeam ups subscription, cloud focus with new hybrid cloud platform

25 Aug 16

Veeam is making the move to a more subscription focused business model, announcing a new Availability Platform for the Hybrid Cloud in a move it says dramatically expands its market penetration.

The Veeam Availability Platform for the Hybrid Cloud will provide businesses and enterprises of all sizes with tools to ensure availability for virtual, physical and cloud-based workloads.

The backup and recovery specialist says the platform provides enterprise continuity with recovery service level objectives of less than 15 minutes for all applications and data, and DR orchestration; along with workload mobility and proactive monitoring, reporting, testing and documentation to ensure business and regulatory requirements are met.

Doug Hazelman, vice president of product strategy and chief evangelist, says the trend towards subscription, rather than perpetual licensing and cloud is driving the changes, with a cloud first strategy increasingly becoming a necessity for survival, rather than a strategy for competitive advantage.

“By 2019, most organisations around the world will need to complete the shift to a predominantly cloud-based IT environment, and this places a huge pressure on availability tools to deliver a constant experience across multiple environments,” Veeam says.

The Availability Platform includes a new Availability Console, a cloud-enabled platform for service providers and distributed enterprise environments.

Veeam Availability Orchestrator, announced several months ago, also forms part of the platform and requires Veeam Availability Suite.

The Orchestrator, which is available on subscription, per VM, enables enterprises to orchestrate specific parts of their environment.

“Customers may not want to orchestrate their entire environment, but just want to orchestrate a proportion of it,” Hazelman says

Also included in the platform are the agent technologies Agent for Microsoft Windows and Agent for Linux, available per workload.

“From a cloud perspective if [customers] already paying a subscription to run their workload in the cloud they shouldn’t have to pay a perpetual license to protect it,” Hazelman says.

Veeam Availability Suite and Veeam Cloud Connect round out the platform.

Hazelman says the company will be making a slow transition over the next 12 to 18 months to a more subscription-based model.

The company’s flagship Veeam Availability Suite, however, will continue to be available on a per socket, perpetual basis.

Around 100 new features and enhancements are due to be introduced with version 9.5 of the Availability Suite, which is expected to be generally available in October.

“But we will introduce subscription SKUs, if the customer wants to use opex instead of capex.

“With 200,000 customers we can’t force everyone to a whole new licensing model,” he says.

“The core business isn’t changing any time soon in terms of how our resellers or partners are going to position or even sell Veeam.”

Peter McKay, Veeam president and COO, says the offering ‘represents an inflection point’ for Veeam.

“Veeam Availability Platform dramatically expands our capabilities and market penetration.

“It marks a new era in how we address enterprise requirements for a comprehensive availability solution for virtual, physical and cloud-based workloads.”

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