Story image

Ovum says security industry 'finally' coming round to automation

23 Jun 2017

The security market is ‘finally’ coming around to the idea of automation, according to Ovum.

Ovum analyst, Rik Turner says the industry may at last be ‘waking up’ probably due to customer demand and the fact that automation is necessary to underpin a security posture that is aware an organisation’s infrastructure is liable to be breached. Not to mention that the cards are currently stacked very much in the attackers’ favour.

“Ovum has noted that, this year, vendors are finally talking about automating the response capability in their security platforms once they have detected something,” says Turner.

“For a few years now, when asked whether they could provide automated responses such as quarantining, then removal of the offending code from wherever it has taken up residence within a corporate infrastructure, they have always replied that they could, but that clients do not want it.”

Turner says the reason for this is fear of false positives.

“Banks do not want to upset high-net-worth customers who might be shut out from their account because the system suspects that they may be bogus,” says Turner.

“Online retailers do not want to create friction by making customers jump through extra authentication hoops unless absolutely necessary. Charities do not want to put off potential online donors because the system is worried they may actually be engaged in money laundering.”

However, Turner says that too appears to be changing, as some real implementation is going beyond just the talk of the past with several vendors now talking freely about exploring their capabilities to include automated response and remediation.

“Their customers are now ready to take this step, which suggests that, as they face the tidal wave of attacks with overworked and frequently understaffed security teams, they are asking their suppliers to stop the more run-of-the-mill stuff, freeing their analysts to focus on the more sophisticated, complex, and difficult-to-detect attacks,” says Turner.

However, one of the greatest barriers to be overcome is the shortage of staff and talent in security, as Turner asserts this is clearly putting pressure to implement more automation where possible.

“Think of it like water: you expect your utility to provide it in clean, drinkable form, leaving you to worry about whether it is hard or soft in your area, and whether you need to add a softener before you turn your washing machine on,” Turner concludes.

Zoom’s new Rooms and Meetings features
Zoom has released information about the upcoming releases for its Rooms and Meeting offerings for 2019.
Aussie company set to democratise direct-to-orbit IoT access
Adelaide-based Myriota has released a developer toolkit that has been trialled and tested by a smart waste management platform.
Apple's AirPods now come with 'Hey Siri' functionality
The new AirPods come with a standard case or a Wireless Charging Case that holds additional charges for more than 24 hours of listening time.
Dynatrace takes pole position in APM Magic Quadrant
It placed highest on Ability to Execute and furthest on Completeness of Vision in the 2019 Quadrant for Application Performance Monitoring (APM).
HCL and Xerox expand strategic partnership
Under the terms of the agreement, HCL will manage portions of Xerox’s shared services, including global administrative and support functions.
Avaya expands integration with Google Cloud AI
This includes embedding Google’s machine learning within conversation services for the contact centre, enabling integration of AI capabilities.
Forrester names Crowdstrike leader in incident response
The report provides an in-depth evaluation of the top 15 IR service providers across 11 criteria.
Poly appoints new A/NZ managing director, Andy Hurt
“We’re excited to be bringing together two established pioneers in audio and video technology to be moving forward and one business – Poly."