Story image

How data security could help you avoid NDB breach reporting

26 Mar 18

Australia’s Privacy Amendment Act (Notifiable Data Breaches) Act 2017 scheme rolled out on February 22 and Europe’s GDPR is just a couple of months away on May 25.

It’s likely that the number of reported data breaches will increase this year as customers’ data security becomes one of the most important developments of the 21st century.

Organisations that lose customers’ financial and sensitive data as a result of breaches are likely to lose 67% of their customer base, according to Gemalto's 2017 Data Breaches and Customer Loyalty report. To keep that loyalty, organisations must demonstrate that they are actively protecting their customer data.

Australian public sector agencies, health service providers, private sector firms with an annual turnover of more than $3 million, some small business and non-government organisations must comply with the Privacy Amendment (NDB) Act.

But not all data breaches require notification if certain data security methods have been put in place.

When appropriate security controls like data encryption and centralised key management are part of those security methods, and customer data is kept safe, organisations don’t need to notify customers.

Courtesy of Gemalto, the NDB has been stripped back to the facts you need to know.

  • What is the Australian Privacy Amendment (Notifiable Data Breaches) Act 2017?
  • Why was it created?
  • What does your organisation need to do to comply?

If you don't find the answers soon, you may face substantial penalties including fines, lost customers and increased risk of future data breaches.

McAfee named Leader in Magic Quadrant an eighth time
The company has been once again named as a Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Security Information and Event Management.
Symantec and Fortinet partner for integration
The partnership will deliver essential security controls across endpoint, network, and cloud environments.
Review: Blue Mic’s Satellite headphones are good but...
Blue Mic’s newest wireless headphones deliver on sound, aesthetic, and comfort - but there is a more insidious issue at hand.
Is Supermicro innocent? 3rd party test finds no malicious hardware
One of the larger scandals within IT circles took place this year with Bloomberg firing shots at Supermicro - now Supermicro is firing back.
IDC: Smartphone shipments ready to stabilise in 2019
IDC expects year-over-year shipment growth of 2.6% in 2019, while the world's largest market is still forecast to be down 8.8% in 2018.
Microsoft NZ bids Goldie a “fond farewell”
Microsoft New Zealand director of commercial and partner business takes new role across the Tasman. The search for his replacement has begun.
Object-based storage over-looked by Aussies, survey shows
Hitachi Vantara has sponsored an IDC survey looking at the technology’s usage and adoption barriers across Asia Pacific.
One Identity a Visionary in Magic Quad for PAM
One Identity was recognised in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Privileged Access Management for completeness of vision and ability to execute.